House Siding – The Complete Homeowner’s Guide

House-Siding-108

No matter where you live or your home’s architectural style, the siding on you home plays a big role in how well your exterior looks and functions. House siding  the exterior of the home from the elements, providing the first line of defense against rain, snow, sun, and wind.

But even more than that, siding contributes to your home’s appearance, character, and beauty. Updating the siding will give a home a fresh new look, and depending on what material you choose for that siding, it can also change the way your home functions and how well it keeps its appearance in future years.

Types of House Siding

House Siding
Image Credit – lowes.com

There are many types and styles of siding on the market today. Siding can be natural or manufactured, high or low maintenance, and designed to fit the style and budget of any home.

Your ultimate choice of siding can be influenced by several  factors, from appearance to longevity. So, it’s helpful to compare the types of siding available; then, you can make an informed decision about which one is right for your home.

1. Wood Siding

House Siding
Image Credit – contemporist.com

One of the oldest types of siding still in use today is wood. Wood comes in several species and can be cut, split, or milled into many shapes and styles of siding, so it can complement a wide range of homes.

Wood is incredibly variable, however, from species to species and style to style, making it difficult to consider it as a single type of siding; it needs to be categorized further to truly grasp its qualities.

Common Wood Species Used for Wood Siding

House Siding
Image Credit – Modernize.com

There are several species of wood that are popular for use on homes, each with its own characteristics and price point.

1. Cypress
House Siding
Image Credit – Arc Wood & Timbers

Cypress is a very hard, durable wood that’s prized for its longevity. It’s not uncommon for cypress to be reclaimed from old buildings and reused just because of its strength and ability to resist rot and moisture. 

Pros of Cypress House Wood Siding

Cypress is naturally resistant to insects, fungus, and rot, so it can last for years without issue. It’s also fairly lightweight, which makes it easy to install, particularly for DIY homeowners and for small crews. It can outlast many types of wood, and it’s possible to find old buildings still covered in cypress that is more than 100 years old. 

Cons Cypress House Wood Siding

Cypress is more expensive than some of the other woods used for home exteriors. It’s also very difficult to cut and mill — while this makes it more durable and longer lasting, it also adds to its initial expense.

2. Red Cedar
House Siding
Image Credit – reddit.com

Red cedar is a very popular material for home exteriors. In fact, when manufacturers of other materials are looking for a wood to emulate in appearance, it’s often cedar that they turn to.

It has a beautiful grain that shows up well underneath stains, but it also looks good painted. It’s frequently found in shingle or shake form, as well as horizontal siding.

Pros of Red Cedar Wood House Siding

Cedar is not only beautiful and full of character, it’s also naturally rot resistant. Like cypress, it resists insects and fungus, as well as most moisture problems. This makes cedar long lasting, so it’s often used not only for the siding but also on the trim of the home.

Cons of Red Cedar Wood House Siding

Cedar has become more expensive over the years, so those looking for an economical wood siding won’t find it here. Cedar can also bleed through most paints, a condition known as “cedar bleed,” so if you intend to paint the siding, you need to prime it first.

Even then, you can often find the knot holes showing up again after just a few years. So, while it’s a beautiful wood for stains, it’s not the best for paint.

3. Redwood
House Siding
Image Credit – buffalo-lumber.com

Redwood is very similar to cedar in many respects and is often used for many of the same reasons. It also has a very rich, deep color, which makes it a good choice for people who want to stain their home and let the natural color and texture of the wood take center stage. 

Pros of Redwood House Siding

Redwood is very durable and holds up well in most climates. Unlike a lot of other woods, redwood doesn’t swell or shrink very much, so it’s less likely to warp and crack and won’t pull at the joints nearly as much.

As such, you can often fit tighter joints on the edges of the home. Redwood also absorbs and retains its finish well, so it may need less maintenance than other wood.

Cons of Redwood House Siding

Redwood can be very expensive, particularly on the East Coast as it often comes with high transportation costs. Sometimes, when painted, redwood can bleed.

While this is less frequent than with cedar, it does mean that redwood should be primed prior to painting, which adds even more to its cost.

4. Pine
House Siding
Image Credit – uslumber.com

Pine is one of the most common types of wood used for siding. It’s inexpensive and comes in several types characterized by how fast it grows. It’s technically a soft wood, but it still has enough durability to hold up well when used on a home’s exterior.

While some other wood species may be found more commonly in certain areas or styles, pine is found nearly everywhere.

Pros of Pine Wood House Siding

Pine is one of the least expensive wood siding types, so it meets the needs of homeowners on a budget. It comes in many styles and is fairly easy to work with, so it can be a good choice for a DIY project. It’s also easy to finish and looks good with both paint and stain.

Cons of Pine Wood House Siding

Depending on the type, at times, pine without a lot of knots can be hard to find. It can also have issues with cracking, cupping, and warping, depending on its quality. Pine also doesn’t last as long as some other woods because it’s affected by insects, fungus, and moisture, so it’s more likely to rot and will often require higher maintenance. 

5. Fir
House Siding
Image Credit – trestlewood.com

Fir is another softwood that’s commonly used on homes. It can be found in longer boards than pine and accepts cutting and milling well, so you can see it formed into a variety of styles and shapes.

It has an attractive grain and appearance, which, coupled with its ability to be formed into so many styles, makes it a popular siding.

Pros of Fir House Siding

Fir has fewer knots and fewer issues with cupping or splitting than pine while still being an easy to work with softwood. It’s very readily available and can be easily found in a number of styles. It looks good painted or stained, and easily accepts a finish without a lot of prep work. 

Cons of Fir House Siding

Fir is a softwood, which means that it will require higher maintenance than some other materials, and it won’t last as long as other more expensive woods. It’s susceptible to moisture, insect activity, fungus, and rot, and it can easily warp if exposed to too much moisture at one time.

6. Spruce
House Siding
Image Credit – houzz.com

Spruce is a variety of pine and is often used for jobs when pine may not be available. It looks and functions a lot like pine but comes in several grades, so it’s possible to find a spruce that can fit into nearly any budget. 

Pros of Spruce House Siding

Spruce looks and functions like pine, which includes taking paint and stain well and looking good in a variety of styles. It’s easy to work with, good for DIY projects, and available in several grade and budget options. 

Cons of Spruce House Siding

Spruce is only available in short lengths because of the knots that are often present. It can be considered a high-maintenance material, needing a lot of sealing, as well as frequent repainting, to keep it looking at its best over time. 

7. Engineered Wood House Siding
House Siding
Image Credit – modernize.com

Engineered wood is a mixture of sawdust and wood chips held together with some binders and resins. It looks like natural wood, but without some of the limitations of wood, such as length or imperfections. 

Pros of Engineered Wood House Siding

Engineered wood is very uniform and easy to install. It looks more natural than vinyl or aluminum, but is often lower in maintenance than natural wood. It’s fairly lightweight and easy to work with, and can be milled into many different styles. 

Cons of Engineered Wood House Siding

The finish on engineered wood can easily be damaged, at which point the siding may be compromised and absorb moisture and swell very quickly. So, while engineered wood is lower in maintenance, you do need to keep a close eye on it at all times and act quickly if you notice any damage.

Wood House Siding Styles

House Siding
Image Credit – architizer.com

Because of the nature of wood and the way that it can be cut and milled, you can find wood siding in many different styles — often more than you’ll find with some other siding materials.

The style of your siding is arguably just as important as the material that you choose. The style should complement your home’s architecture and design while helping to make the statement that you want for your home’s curb appeal. 

1. Board and Batten Wood House Siding
House Siding

Board and batten siding is one of the oldest types of siding in the US. It was first used when sawmills became prevalent and wood boards could be easily milled for the first time. The style consists of wide boards installed on the home vertically from top to bottom.

Thin strips called battens are fastened over the seams in the boards, making the installation weathertight. This is still a popular style for cottages, farmhouses, and many other rustic style homes.

Pros

Having board and batten siding can make your home look taller. It also has a more rural look, which helps it complement a variety of home styles better than horizontal siding.

Depending on the length of the boards, it’s possible to have few to no seams other than those covered by the battens, making it a weathertight design. This is also a visually appealing style as it’s not as common and therefore more eye-catching than other styles. 

Cons

Board and batten siding can be a little harder and more expensive to install and maintain than other styles. Not only is there the additional step of installing a batten on every seam, but the battens can make it harder to scrape and repaint the siding, so the cost of a new paint job will be higher with this style.

If you have a very tall home, you will need to find a way to cover the horizontal seam to make the transitions, which can affect the appearance of the home.

Cost

Board and batten total cost will vary depending on the wood that you choose, with some species being more expensive than others.

It has an average cost of $4 to $6 a square foot installed, but this does not include the cost of painting the siding; having pre-painted or pre-primed boards can cost more as well. 

Installation

Board and batten is a vertical installation style. It begins at one side of the home after the walls have been wrapped and flashing has been installed around the windows, doors, and edges. The boards are installed first, with a slight gap left for expansion between them.

They’re lined up and nailed to the studs until the entire row has been covered. The battens are installed second, fastened over the gaps between the boards. The siding is trimmed and finished like other wood siding once the field has been completed.

2. Lap Siding
House Siding
Image Credit – northmountainstructures.com 

Lap siding is one of the most common types of wood siding installed in the US. This style of siding is frequently called horizontal lap, dutch lap, or drop siding. It’s a type of horizontal siding where each board drops or “laps” the one below it. This creates a more weathertight siding that’s also very quick and easy to install, as well as less expensive to create than tongue and groove. 

Pros

Lap siding is easy to install and good for DIY jobs. It complements most architectural styles and looks good in a variety of colors as well as wood stains, so you can change the appearance of your home with lap siding just by changing the color. Depending on the type of wood that you use, it can also be fairly economical, especially when compared with other types of siding.

Cons

Lap siding has become fairly ubiquitous over the years, and most people aren’t able to distinguish true lap siding from other forms such as clapboard. It’s weathertight, but like any wood siding, it will require a lot of maintenance. Each of the many boards needs to be scraped and painted individually, and most lap siding tends to have fairly narrow boards, making this a labor-intensive process.

Cost

Lap siding is one of the more economical ways to install wood. Its cost will be driven mostly by the material; pine will have the lowest costs at $1 — $3 a square foot installed, while redwood and cypress can cost well over $10 a square foot installed. 

Installation

Lap siding installation can vary slightly depending on the exact style of the wood, but most install similarly enough to make the process fairly easy. The siding installs from the bottom up, beginning roughly 6 inches up off the ground on a starter strip. Each subsequent course is designed to lock and overlap with the one below it. The planks are nailed at the top, so when the next course overlaps, the nails are hidden from view. 

3. Drop Channel Wood Siding
House Siding

Drop channel siding is a good choice for rustic or rural homes. It’s frequently installed horizontally but can be installed vertically or even diagonally as well, giving you a lot of options for covering your home.

Drop channel siding is unique in the way the boards fit together. One side of each plank is milled to be thinner than the other side. A groove is milled into the bottom edge of the thicker side, and the thinner end snaps into it, creating a watertight exterior.

The look is reminiscent of both shiplap and tongue and groove siding but with a unique shadow between each plank created by the “channel” where each plank thins.

Pros

This is a unique looking siding that works really well on rustic or rural homes. It’s unusual in a world of lap siding, so it will attract a lot of second looks. Because you can use the same siding in different directions, it also provides some versatility in how you install the planks. This method of installation also gives the wood a lot of room to expand and contract because it moves together without fighting nails. So, there’s less chance of warping or splitting over time.

Cons

This style of siding is less common, so it will be harder to find and somewhat more expensive both to purchase and install. It’s also slightly more time-consuming to install than lap siding, which is designed to have a fast installation. This in turn, adds more to the labor costs.

Cost

Like for other siding types, the cost will be at least partially driven by the type of wood from which your siding is made. Any wood can be milled into drop channel siding, but with its more difficult installation, costs will start closer to $10 a square foot and go up from there even for the least expensive pine.

Installation

At the start, drop channel installation has a lot in common with any wood siding installation. The house is wrapped and flashed around the windows and doors, and a starter strip is begun roughly 6 inches off the ground. The first course is nailed at the starter strip, and the next slides into place directly over it, so the two pieces of siding lock together. Sometimes, it can take some finessing and a little knocking from the hammer to get them to fit snuggly. The installation continues upward, with each subsequent course fitted onto the one below. Nails, when needed, are hidden in the channel.

4. Tongue and Groove Siding
House Siding
Image Credit – houzz.com

Tongue and groove siding creates a very tight, nearly seamless appearance for your home. Similar to the way that hardwood floors are made and installed, tongue and groove siding has a thin milled “tongue” on one end of each plank. A corresponding groove is milled into the bottom edge. This allows the siding to lock together without the need for a lot of nails or fasteners. 

Pros

tongue and groove siding gives your home a much tighter exterior, with fewer gaps and less space for moisture to infiltrate. It gives a nice look to rustic-style homes, as well as a more unique appearance than the more common lap siding.

Cons

Like drop channel siding, this style has a more difficult installation, so it’s going to be more expensive, take longer to install, and it’s not going to be as easy to find. It’s more common in rougher pine planks, and while you can find it in more weather resistant woods as well, it’s a lot less common.

Cost

Tongue and groove planks are more common in lower cost woods like pine but can be found in all wood species. For this reason, it can have a wide range of costs, as well as a higher than average cost for installation. Expect to pay at least $10 a square foot installed for pine and more for other species.

Installation

Installation is a little more time consuming with this style but is otherwise similar to drop channel and other wood siding installations. It installs on a home that has been wrapped and flashed, with a starter strip installed about 6 inches up from the ground.

The first course is held in place with nails in the starter strip, which is designed to fit right into the first course above it. Each subsequent course is fitted to the one below, like a hardwood floor installation. 

5. Split Log Siding
House Siding
Image Credit – e-logsiding.com

Split log siding gives your home the appearance of a log cabin. Rather than being built from whole logs, however, this siding is made from half or quarter logs that have been peeled and milled. They are installed over a solid exterior wall, so they’re tighter than actual log cabins, but can still provide that appearance. 

Pros

This style is great for getting the look of a log cabin, made from real wood, but for less maintenance and lower building costs. The logs can be installed over an existing home, so any home can take on the appearance of a log cabin instantly. 

Cons

These logs are custom milled to fit each home, so they can be very expensive compared to other types of siding. Like all log homes, the logs do need to be sealed and pressure washed, and they will still swell and shrink, so they need to be properly installed to avoid serious issues. 

Cost

The cost of log siding depends on two things — the exact wood species and how thick the “logs” are. Quarter logs will be much less expensive than half logs,but if you have them milled for your home, they can be even more costly. Expect the material itself to cost from $5 to $10 a square foot, and installation to take on another $4 – $10 a square foot as well.

Installation

Split logs are installed directly over a plywood exterior. If you use housewrap, make sure it’s translucent or transparent so you can see the studs and chalk lines easily. This siding starts at the bottom, and is nailed in at the top of each log at an angle, so the next course butting up against it will hide the nail. The logs are installed tightly fitted for the best results, but they do require some expansion room, so space needs to be left at the ends and trimmed.

6. Shingle Siding
House Siding

Shingles are a very popular exterior cladding for many homes. They can be used to cover the entirety of the home, or they can be used as an accent paired with other siding styles. While you only see a portion of each shingle, the shingles themselves extend for several inches beneath the next course, so the overlap is big enough to create a watertight exterior. Shingles are usually uniform in size and shape, but they can be irregular for a more rustic look. 

Pros

Shingles have a great, rustic appearance. They are suitable for many styles of home and look good either painted or stained. They can be uniform or slightly irregular, and it’s also possible to find decorative shingles with rounded edges as well.

Cons

Shingles are more time consuming to install. They can also be slightly higher in maintenance when the time comes to paint or stain, as the many pieces can make scraping, patching, and painting a little more difficult than long planks. Shingles can also be more expensive than some sidings both to purchase and to install.

Cost

Most shingle siding is priced at $6 – $9 per square foot installed. Some more durable wood species, however, like cypress, may increase the cost of your project. 

Installation

Shingles install on a wrapped and flashed home that has had trim applied to the edges and around the windows. The bottom of the shingles should be installed roughly 6 inches from the ground. The shingles themselves are installed at a bottom corner, nailed about half way up.

The next course overlaps the first by several inches; you can create a more irregular look by varying the overlap amount, or keep it uniform for a cleaner look. The courses continue from an outside corner, in as well as up, before the final trim is applied. 

6. Shake Siding
House Siding
Image Credit – kpvinylsiding.com

Shake siding is similar to shingle, but with a thicker, more rustic appearance. Shakes are traditionally hand split, so they’re a little less uniform in size and thickness than shingles. In other ways, however, they install similarly, and give your home a rustic appearance. 

Pros

Shakes have many of the pros of shingles, with the added bonus of being even more rustic with a more substantial appearance and texture to them. They’re a little rougher and will give more texture and dimension to the exterior of the home.

Cons

Shakes can be a little more expensive than other materials. They’re also a little more difficult to install due to their thickness, and their rougher texture makes maintenance a little more difficult. 

Cost

Shake siding has a cost of around $14 a square foot installed, partly due to the more time-consuming installation, and partly due to the thicker material. 

Installation

Shakes install very similarly to shingles, on a wrapped and flashed home that’s been trimmed on the edges and around the windows. The bottom of the shakes should be installed roughly 6 inches up from the ground, with the shakes themselves installed at a bottom corner, nailed about half way up.

The next course overlaps the first by several inches, and due to the thicker material, you’ll get a more irregular look naturally, simply trying to match up the thinner spaces.  The courses continue from an outside corner, in as well as up, before the final trim is applied.

Maintenance of Wood Siding

House Siding
Image Credit – diynetwork.com

Compared to some other types of siding, wood can be considered a high-maintenance material for your home’s exterior. However, not all wood siding is equal; you may find that some more durable woods need less maintenance while some softwoods like pine need more.

You can clean your wood siding annually with a soft brush and wood cleaner to remove mildew and other surface stains and return it to its natural color.

Make sure there are no shrubs, trees, or other landscaping coming in contact with the wood, and walk the perimeter yearly to inspect it for signs of insect activity or damage.

Replace any boards that you see beginning to warp, crack, or swell or that are rotting or harboring insects. Scrape off loose paint every few years and reapply to protect the wood from moisture damage.

Wood Siding Design Ideas

Wood siding can be used in a large variety of ways. If you’re planning on siding your home in wood, check out these design ideas for inspiration. 

Vertical Wood House Siding
House Siding
Image Credit: Houzz.com.au

You can achieve the look of this modern timber home by using a tongue-and-groove wood siding that’s been installed vertically.

The tight fit of the planks creates a rustic-modern appeal that works well on the architecture. Wider planks are also used in sections to create a three-dimensional accent area that widens the appeal. The entire home is stained a rich, dark brown that will weather well. 

Traditional Lap House Siding
House Siding
Image Credit: Houzz.com.au

This white home features a crisp, white lap siding to give it a traditional appeal. The planks are slightly wider than normal, which gives the home a slightly more updated appearance, setting it apart from the rest of the neighborhood. Using just one type of siding over the entirety keeps the look clean and simple.

Transitional Lap House Siding
House Siding
Image Credit: Houzz.com.au

Lap siding can also be used on a more transitional home design. This two-story home features a very classic lap siding, but has a more transitional appearance, blending some modern elements with classic design.

The siding is used over the entire property, keeping the exterior simple so that other architectural elements can shine. 

Suggested Wood House Siding Manufacturers

1. TruWood Siding and Trim

TruWood is a manufacturer of engineered wood and trim. The material the produce is highly sustainable, as well as authentic looking, with a natural cedar grain. The planks are treated with zinc borate to deter insects and maintain the siding in good repair longer, and they come factory primed and ready for paint. The material installs just like other wood siding and comes with a 30 year warranty. 

2. Maibec

Whether you want real wood siding or engineered wood siding, Maibec makes a high-quality product in a range of styles, finishes, and colors. Choose from different plank styles for both horizontal and board and batten siding, as well as both authentic and contemporary surface textures. The professionals at Maibec can match any color you bring them, or choose from one of theirs to get a quality siding for your home. 

3. Roseburg

If you’re looking for a combination of beauty and durability, consider the siding from Roseburg. Roseburg produces three styles of siding, each with a durable plywood core and a hardwood veneer. This gives you beauty, affordability, and durability in one. The company offers both lap siding and board and -batten in different looks to match your home.

Wood House Siding Makes a Classic Choice

Wood siding is one of the oldest types of exterior siding still in use today. It’s beautiful, long-lasting, and extremely versatile, giving you many options for your home. With so many wood species, styles, and installation types, it’s possible to find a wood siding that will complement any home.

2. Vinyl House Siding

House Siding
Image Credt- bobvila.com

Vinyl siding was introduced in the 1950s as a lower maintenance alternative to wood siding. It’s made from a plastic called polyvinyl chloride, and its color goes straight through the material, rather than sitting on top like paint on wood. It’s made by pouring the plastic into molds, giving it a variety of looks and textures as well as a variety of colors to choose from. 

Cost of Vinyl House Siding

Vinyl siding comes in several styles and colors, which can mean a different range of costs for each installation. It can average $8 – $12 a square foot installed, although some very simple vinyl siding can be found for around $4 a foot. 

Pros and Cons of Vinyl House Siding

Vinyl siding is definitely lower in maintenance than wood. It resists moisture, rot, and insect activity, and the color will never peel, chip, or fade. It’s fairly easy to clean, and it comes in several styles so you can mix and match to get the right look for your home.

Vinyl does best when installed in a moderate climate. If it’s installed in a hot climate, it can soften, melt, and warp in direct sunlight or when exposed to heat from a fire. In a cold climate, it can become brittle and crack if hit. It’s also very lightweight, which makes for an easy installation but also means it may be blown off by a stiff wind. 

Styles and Types of Vinyl House Siding

While it can’t be milled like wood, vinyl siding can be molded into many different types and styles for installation. This offers a lot of options for how you’ll use it on your home.

1. Clapboard Vinyl House Siding
House Siding
Image Credit – houzz.com

Most horizontal siding is a variation of clapboard siding. In the case of vinyl siding, it is usually called clapboard when it refers to a traditional profile, which has very straight planks that overlap one another slightly. 

Pros and Cons of Clapboard Vinyl House Siding

This is a very traditional style of siding. The planks are plain and uniform which gives the siding a subtle appearance. Not everyone likes this style, as it is very utilitarian, but it does work well in older neighborhoods.

Installation of Clapboard Vinyl House Siding

Most horizontal vinyl siding installs in the same way. The planks are installed two at a time, and they are designed to lock onto one another, so that each course covers the one below. It’s started at the bottom, nailed to a starter strip, and the other courses are either nailed or snapped into place depending on the brand. Like other sidings, it should be installed over a wrapped house, with the windows, doors, and edges trimmed first. 

2. Dutch Lap Vinyl House Siding
House Siding
Image Credit – libertyhomesolutions.com

Dutch lap vinyl siding is another style of horizontal lap siding. It’s a little more decorative than clapboard style, with a dip and reveal in each plank that casts a wider shadow. This makes the style a little more interesting to view, while still being traditional. 

Pros and Cons of Dutch Lap Vinyl House Siding

This is a slightly more decorative style of siding. The reveal gives you a wider shadow, which emphasizes the appearance of the planks, so your siding will likely get more attention. It’s not a good style for those prefer a clean appearance, however, as the reveal does create a more dramatic look

Installation of Dutch Lap Vinyl House Siding

Dutch lap vinyl siding installs in the same way as other horizontal lap sidings. It goes up two planks at a time, and each course is designed to overlap the one below it, hiding the joins or nails. 

3. Beaded Seam Vinyl House Siding
House Siding
Image Credit – Pinterest.com

Beaded seam vinyl siding is also a horizontal lap siding style. At the bottom of each plank is a rolled or beaded edge. This style is a nice compromise between clapboard and dutch lap as it’s slightly more decorative than clapboard but not as dramatic as dutch lap.

Pros and Cons of Beaded Seam Vinyl House Siding

This is a more subtle style of siding, so if you want a little bit of an accent, it’s a good choice. It’s not very common, however, so you may have more difficulty finding this style than the others. 

Installation of Beaded Seam Vinyl House Siding

This siding also installs like other horizontal lap siding. It may go up one plank at a time, rather than two depending on the manufacturer. This can mean it takes slightly longer to install, but otherwise it has the same parameters as other horizontal vinyl sidings. 

4. Board and Batten Vinyl House Siding
House Siding
Image Credit – youtube.com

For those who prefer a vertical siding style, board and batten is currently the only option for vinyl siding in a vertical placement. Rather than being made of separate boards and battens like wood, it’s usually made of a course of two planks and one batten in a single formed section. This makes for a faster, easier installation that’s also more watertight. 

Pros and Cons of Board and Batten Vinyl House Siding

This style of vinyl siding is ideal for use with a rainscreen, as there is little gap. It’s also fast and easy to install, and can give you a traditional look very quickly. However, it’s more limited in terms of size and color than some other siding materials, so you may not have many choices. In addition, you may need a transition course at the top of the planks if you intend to do more than one story, as the planks only come in one length. 

Installation of Board and Batten Vinyl House Siding

Vinyl board and batten siding is very quick and easy to install. It should be installed over a wrapped exterior that has had the windows, doors, and edges trimmed. It installs at an outside corner moving in, with the first course nailed into place, and the subsequent course locking onto the first to hide the seam and create a tight installation. The edge courses will need additional trim to hide the nails. 

5. Traditional Shake Vinyl House Siding
Image Credit – vinylsiding.org

Traditional shake vinyl siding is designed to mimic the appearance of wood shakes. Instead of individual shakes, however, these go up in long rows of planks that are shaped to give you the appearance of wood shakes. They can be fairly smooth or highly textured, and will have a very clean, straight edge at the bottom. 

Pros and Cons of Traditional Shake Vinyl House Siding

This is a great way to get the look of wood shakes for less money and maintenance. They’re also much easier to install, as they go up in whole rows at once, making them a good choice for DIY. However, they definitely have a more uniform look than natural wood shakes — you can generally tell that they’re vinyl from a distance. They also tend to have more obvious seams than wood shakes.

Installation of Traditional Shake Vinyl House Siding

Shake vinyl siding installs just like plank vinyl siding; each row is designed to cover the top of the row below. They can lock onto one another or be nailed into place, with each course overlapping the one below, so that it hides the join. 

6. Cedar Shake Vinyl Siding
House Siding
Image Credit – pinterest.com

Cedar shake vinyl siding is another style that offers the look of wood shingles or shakes on your home, with lower maintenance. Like traditional shake vinyl siding, it installs in long rows, so it’s faster and easier to install. The sections usually have a straight bottom edge, but always have a more textured appearance, rather than a more smooth surface that you can sometimes find on the traditional style. 

Pros and Cons of Cedar Shake Vinyl Siding

This is a good way to get the look of real cedar shingles for less. The vinyl can give you a similar appearance but with faster and easier installation and less maintenance. This is a good material for DIY installation as well. However, like traditional shakes, they do have a very obvious seam between the sections that can be hard to hide and that often gives away their material construction. 

Installation of Cedar Shake Vinyl Siding

These install just like the traditional style; in rows that overlap one another. They can be attached to one another or nailed into place. This depends largely on the manufacturer, but some types can be nailed or use a strip for snapping, at your or the installer’s choice.

7. Hand Split Shake Vinyl Siding
House Siding
Image Credit – vinylsiding.org

If you like the more irregular appearance of hand split wood shakes, you can still get that look with vinyl. Like the straight-edged variety, these shakes are formed in long rows for easier installation. They have a more irregular bottom edge, though, which can give a more rustic and authentic look to the finished installation. 

Pros and Cons of Hand Split Shake Vinyl Siding

The appearance of these shakes is a little more authentic with a rougher texture and different edge style. They would look better on a rustic style home, while being less maintenance than actual cedar. They will suffer the same problems of vinyl, however, if that rustic home is located in an area that sees a lot of very hot or very cold days. Vinyl does best in a moderate climate. 

Installation of Hand Split Shake Vinyl Siding

Hand split vinyl shakes will install the same way that other vinyl shakes do. They go up in long rows, and will overlap the course below to help hide the way they are fastened. They can be nailed or snap onto one another.

8. Smooth Vinyl House Siding
House Siding
Image Credit – builddirect.com

Smooth vinyl siding is any type of horizontal lap siding that has a smooth finish rather than a wood grain texture. This mimics the look of historic homes in which the wood was sanded smooth before painting and installing to give it a sleeker appearance. 

Pros and Cons of Smooth Vinyl House Siding

Smooth vinyl siding looks better on some older, more traditionally styled homes. It may also be slightly easier to clean as there is no grain to hold dirt. This is a plainer form of siding, however. Many people prefer the texture of vinyl that mimics the look of wood, thinking it does a better job of appearing authentic.

Installation of Smooth Vinyl House Siding

This material will install like any lap vinyl siding. Each course will lap the one below and be either nailed into place or locked onto the other panels for a faster installation. 

9. Wood Grain Vinyl Siding
House Siding
Image Credit – woodtone.com

Wood grain vinyl siding is the most common style of vinyl available. It’s found in shake, plank, or board-and-batten style and it has a simulated wood grain to give it a more authentic appearance. The texture can be subtle or pronounced, depending on the brand and the style of siding.

Pros and Cons of Wood Grain Vinyl Siding

This style of siding has a more authentic look than the smooth. It looks more like wood than plastic, so it can work well on a wider range of home styles. The texture of the vinyl can make it a little harder to keep clean, as the grain can hold dirt more easily than the smooth siding. 

Installation of Wood Grain Vinyl Siding

The ease of installation of wood grain siding depends on the style of the planks, as it is available in so many styles. All of them are easy to install, often going up in longer rows and sections than wood, which is a quicker install. The lengths can be nailed or locked onto one another. 

10. Half-Round (Scalloped) Vinyl Siding
House Siding
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Half-round vinyl siding is a more decorative shingle. It’s often used as an accent to highlight certain parts of the exterior, such as beneath the gables. It can also be used to complement certain decorative home styles, such as Victorian. It’s made up of rows of shingles that have a rounded bottom to give them a scalloped design. 

Pros and Cons

This is a good style to use as an accent. It’s decorative and attention getting, so you can easily use it to highlight specific sections of your home. It’s not available in as many colors as other sidings, so you may have trouble mixing and matching or getting the color you want to really make it stand out.

Installation

Half-round siding installs just like other shingle styles. It’s formed in long rows, so it goes up in long sections at once, with the bottom of each course covering the one below. They can be nailed or locked onto one another.

11. Log Vinyl House Siding
House Siding
Image Credit – pinterest.com

Log vinyl siding is a lightweight, inexpensive material that offers the look of a log cabin for any home. These hollow planks look like logs, complete with texture, but are made of vinyl, so they install very quickly and easily. 

Pros and Cons

This is a fast, inexpensive method for getting the look of a log home. It’s also slightly less maintenance than a real log home because the material doesn’t swell and shrink or need to be stained. It is very thin, however, and unless it’s insulated, it can crack over time, especially in colder climates. 

Installation

This material is fairly easy to install. It goes up with several sections at once, and they overlap one another on the edges, so they cover the seams. They can interlock so that only the starting rows need to be nailed, but many will use starting strips, screwed to the home first, onto which the siding then locks.

Maintenance of Vinyl House Siding

House Siding
Image Credit – marshallbuildingandremodeling.com

Vinyl siding is fairly easy to maintain as it doesn’t require painting, scraping, or regular repairs. It can be easily cleaned with a hose and, in some cases, a pressure washer.

For some algae stains, it can be cleaned with a mixture of water and bleach sprayed directly onto the siding and agitated with a brush. You can also use a mixture of laundry detergent mixed with water to help scrub off some stains. 

Vinyl House Siding Design Ideas

Vinyl siding comes in many different colors, styles, and textures, which can be used alone or in combination to provide a variety of looks.

Traditional Lap Siding
House Siding
Image Credit: houzz.com

This Craftsman bungalow makes good use of vinyl siding in a traditional lap style. This “clapboard” style has a simple appearance, letting the architecture of the home be the main focus, rather than the siding. 

Transitional Design House Siding
House Siding
Image Credit: houzz.com

Vinyl siding can be used to create a more transitional design. This home also uses a clapboard style lap siding, but with a smoother texture. This complements the longer lines of the home, helping to bridge the gap between traditional and modern and create a fresh exterior.

Simple Bungalow House Siding
House Siding
Image Credit: houzz.com

Vinyl siding looks good on most styles of home. This bungalow needs a simple siding to complement its lines. The vinyl siding in a light color with crisp white trim easily  accomplishes this goal.

Suggested Vinyl Siding Manufacturers

If you’re considering purchasing vinyl siding for your home, the following is a list of suggested manufacturers .

1. CertainTeed

CertainTeed makes an incredible range of vinyl siding products including multiple types of lap siding, board, and batten, and shingle. It also offers a more durable vinyl line and an insulated line, so you can find the right fit for your home and needs. 

2. Norandex

Norandex manufactures a full line of premium vinyl siding products, with  a range of options including thicker materials and different styles and textures, giving you the right material for the job.

3. Royal Building Products

Royal Building Products has a full range of both vinyl and PVC siding in several styles and textures. It also offers some highly durable and insulated lines, making them a good choice for those that want a long-lasting siding.

Low Maintenance Vinyl

Vinyl siding is a good choice for homeowners looking for a low maintenance material that never needs painting. It’s also a good choice for those looking for something easy to install. It comes in nearly as many styles and types as wood siding, so you won’t feel shorted in style.

3. Stone House Siding

House Siding
Image Credit – windowworldatlanta.com

Stone siding can give your home a rustic, natural appearance. It can be used as an accent or to cover the entirety of your home. Stone siding can be made of solid, natural stone or a stone veneer that is a form of cement siding made to look like stone. Stone siding comes in many colors and sizes, making it possible to create a wide range of looks. 

Cost of Stone House Siding

Stone siding has a range of pricing, depending on what you’re installing. Solid stone siding, which is made from granite, limestone, or sandstone, usually costs around $18 a square foot. Stone veneer siding costs between $4 and $10 a square foot, depending on the color and type.

Types of Stone House Siding

House Siding
Image Credit – tablerockco.com

There are several types of stone siding, which can give your home a wide range of appearances. Each type may wear and install differently, as well, so it’s worth comparing the types to find the right fit for your home. 

1. Solid Stone Siding
House Siding
Image Credit – archiexpo.com

Solid stone siding is made from pieces of limestone, granite, sandstone, or other stones. These natural materials come in a variety of thicknesses as well as colors and finishes. They can be rough cut, tumbled, or smooth and matte, and they may vary widely from piece to piece and even within one piece, depending on the stone. Stone will vary from lot to lot in color and appearance, so you should always get a sample from a current lot.

Pros and Cons

Natural stone siding is the most durable and long lasting of any type of stone-look siding. It also has a natural authenticity to it; no two pieces of stone are ever identical, so your home will never look exactly like those around it. Such variation can be seen as a negative by some people, however; if you don’t like surprises or the idea that you may have one piece of stone that is different from the rest, this is not the material for you.

Installation

Natural stone siding is installed using mortar in a manner similar to brick. This does require a specialist to install. The stone should be sorted in a dry layout first to maximize color and size diversity and to ensure fit. It should be mortared directly onto the wall of the home, with each piece being set in place individually, and the mortar pointed between the stones for the best look and most water resistant application. 

2. Natural Stone Cladding
House Siding
Image Credit – 123rf.com

Natural stone cladding is a thinner type of stone siding. It’s therefore slightly less expensive, and usually more uniform in terms of size and shape. It has all the characteristics of stone and installs in a similar way.

Pros and Cons

Natural stone cladding is natural stone, but cut into thinner, more uniform pieces. It’s less expensive than solid stone and a little easier to install. It can also have a lot of variation in terms of color, both from piece to piece and within one piece, and come in a number of finishes. Installed properly, it’s completely weather resistant.However, it is still very expensive, requires a professional installation, and is subject to a lot of variation that can be seen as a drawback by some homeowners. 

Installation

Natural stone cladding installs similarly to both brick siding and solid stone siding. It needs a mortar base and should be installed by a professional in the field. A dry layout for fit is recommended before mortaring the stones into place. 

3. Manufactured Stone Siding
House Siding
Image Credit – constructionspecifier.com

If you want the look of stone for less, along with better control over the color and appearance, you can use manufactured stone siding to great effect. Manufactured stone siding is sometimes called stone veneer siding, and doesn’t actually contain stone. Instead, it’s usually made of a type of fiber cement and wears similarly.

Pros and Cons

Manufactured stone siding can last for many years without needing any maintenance. It’s flame retardant and moisture resistant and can provide the look of stone without the cost. It comes in many colors and styles, but doesn’t have the same amount of extreme variation as natural stone. It’s not as long lasting as natural stone, however, and cutting and installing the material can produce a lot of dust, which can be hazardous to inhale. 

Installation

Manufactured stone siding may be installed in several ways, depending on how it was produced. It may install similarly to fiber cement in either individual pieces or panels that can interlock and are nailed into place, or it may be mortared into place.

Because of the amount of silica it often contains, care should be taken when cutting the material. Otherwise, it’s often easy to install, going up faster than natural stone. 

4. Veneer Panel Stone Siding
House Siding
Image Credit – pinterest.com

Veneer panel stone siding is a type of manufactured stone siding that’s installed in larger panels. This makes installation faster and easier, with less variation between the stones. Like most manufactured stone, it’s made of a type of fiber cement, so it tends to resist weather conditions well and has little to no maintenance. 

Pros and Cons

Veneer panel stone siding is easier to install than other types. It’s also flame retardant and moisture resistant, as well as low maintenance in general. It doesn’t have quite as authentic an appearance as natural stone siding or cladding, or as much variation, because it goes up in panels or large sections at a time. It makes a nice accent material, however, for skirts and small sections. 

Installation

Veneer panel stone siding is fairly easy to install. It goes up in large sections or panels that overlap one another, so the nails are usually hidden beneath the edge of the next panel. The sections install from the outside corner in, after the house has been trimmed and flashed. The edges of each panel are nailed down; then, the next panel overlaps to hide the nails. The final panels are edged with trim for a finished look. 

5. Polyurethane Faux Stone Panel Siding
House Siding
Image Credit – myfulldecor.com

Polyurethane faux stone panel siding is a lightweight material crafted to look like stone. It’s sold in panels so it’s fairly easy to install, and from a distance it looks a lot like natural stone but with much less variation in terms of color, texture, and size. It’s long lasting and weather resistant, as well as less expensive to install than stone siding.

Pros and Cons

Polyurethane faux stone panel siding is very easy to install. It’s lightweight and goes up in large panels at once, so installation takes less time than other styles, and it often costs less as well. The material doesn’t feel like stone and has a lot less variation than stone, so it won’t look quite as authentic, but it works well for small areas.

Installation

These panels can be installed in different ways, depending on the manufacturer. They may be glued down to a wrapped and trimmed home, or they may nail down with overlapping edges to hide the joins. Being so light, their installation generally goes very quickly. 

Materials for Stone Siding

The name “stone siding” speaks more to the appearance of the siding than what it may actually be made of. While some stone sidings are made of natural stone, many are not.

1. Cement

Cement is one of the most common materials utilized for manufacturing stone siding. Often called stone veneer siding, this is a form of fiber cement made from sand, silica, cellulose fiber, and Portland cement. Made in a mold, it can take on a number of textures including that of stone. It may come in individual pieces of panels, depending on the manufacturer, and most come in a range of colors.

Pros and Cons

Cement stone siding is much less expensive than natural stone siding, making it a good alternative for those on a budget. It looks and acts a lot like stone — flame retardant and moisture resistant. It’s also fairly long wearing and easy to install. While it looks like stone, it won’t have quite the same appearance or authenticity. It may install in panels, which makes it easier, which can make it sometimes be apparent if not put up correctly. It also doesn’t last quite as long as natural stone, and it may chip on impact.

2. Natural Stone

Natural stone such as granite, limestone, and sandstone is also used to create natural stone siding and cladding, which come in a wide range of colors, textures, and styles and can install in a variety of ways. This material is very long wearing and naturally flame retardant and moisture resistant. It can give your home a very natural appearance. 

Pros and Cons

Natural stone siding is beautiful, with a lot of natural variation in texture and appearance. It can vary in color from piece to piece and within one piece, which is part of what makes it so special. This variation can make it harder to install, however, and isn’t right for everyone. Stone is also more expensive and requires a professional who understands its nature to install properly.

3. Polyurethane

Polyurethane is a less commonly used material for creating stone siding. It’s made from  a type of plastic foam, so it’s lightweight yet durable as well as easy to install. It goes up in panels, so installation is often quick and easy as well.

Pros and Cons

Polyurethane stone siding is less expensive than other types of stone siding to purchase and install. It also has less variation than natural stone, so it’s a good fit for those who don’t like surprises. It doesn’t feel like stone, however, and the panels can be obviously visible if not installed correctly. It’s also not flame retardant and can melt or catch fire at high temperatures. 

Maintenance of Stone Siding

The maintenance of your stone siding will depend a lot on what type of material you have installed. Natural stone siding is fairly low maintenance; you can usually use a pressure washer to remove any debris easily, or you can use a brush with a mixture of laundry detergent and water.

Cement siding and polyurethane are also low maintenance; brushing with laundry detergent and water is usually all that’s necessary. Avoid using a pressure washer when possible so as not to harm the finish. 

Stone Siding Design Ideas

Stone siding can give your home a wide range of appearances. It can cover its entire facade or be used as an accent. Check out these design ideas for inspiration for your home.

Mixed Material Exterior
House Siding
Image Credit – houzz.com

This home features a mix of siding types, including stone siding as an accent. The stone siding is used on the chimney and on the bump-out. The colors of the stone pick up the color of the natural cedar shingles, while complementing the color of the lap siding at the same time. 

Contemporary Accent
House Siding
Image Credit – houzz.com

Even modern homes can make great use of stone siding. This home features natural stone cladding as a skirt around the perimeter of the home. It also features two accent walls. The same material is used to create a wall around the property, tying the areas together for a more cohesive and natural look. 

Mixed Sizing Accent
House Siding

This home uses a light colored stone siding as an accent on both the front columns and the garage. The stone uses a pattern of different sizes mixed together, repeating over the surface. This is combined with a mix of light colors in the stone, which adds to the interest. 

Suggested Stone Siding Manufacturers

If you’re interested in stone siding for your home, check out these manufacturers for more information. 

1. Provia

Check out Provia If you’re looking for a natural looking stone veneer that comes in a wide range of sizes and styles. Provia’s material can be installed in mortar, piece by piece like real stone, but with better control over sizing and color. This company offers an incredible range of styles, making it possible to find one that will fit any exterior. 

2. Coronado

Coronado manufacturers a wide range of stone veneer products in several sizes, colors, and styles. Itsr durable, attractive materials can be installed in several ways, so you can get the look that’s right for your home, regardless of its architectural style. 

3. Cultured Stone

If you’re looking for options with veneers, panels, and surface textures, be sure to visit Cultured Stone. This company boasts more than 50 years of experience making stone veneer products, including brick veneers, stacked stone, and panels for easy installation. It offers a wide range of styles and colors, as well, to suit any application.

Get a Natural Look with Stone Siding for your House

House Siding
Image Credit – windowworldatlanta.com

Stone siding is beautiful, durable, and timeless. Whether you choose natural stone or a manufactured material, stone siding is a fantastic accent or cladding for nearly every style of home. 

4. Steel & Metal House Siding

House Siding
Image Credit – metalarchitecture.com

Whether you’re looking for something contemporary or rustic for your home’s exterior, it’s hard to beat steel and metal siding for durability. Metal siding can easily last 100 years or more depending on its type, style, and thickness.

It can be virtually indistinguishable from wood, or it can let its own color and nature shine come through. Available in a range of colors and finishes as well as styles, it’s easy to find a metal siding that will work for any home.

Types of Exterior Metal Siding

There are many kinds of metal siding available, including different metals and styles, so it’s important to study each one to find the right fit. 

1. Copper Siding
House Siding
Image Credit – pinterest.com

If you really want to make a statement that makes your home stand out, consider installing copper siding. Copper has a unique color that gradually oxidizes over time, darkening and developing a patina. With the right care, it can also maintain its natural golden color as well. Copper comes in panels that can provide a standing seam installation.

Cost

Copper is more expensive than some other materials, costing between $8 and $11 a square foot just for the material. It’s easy to work with and install, however, so finding a professional who can put it up should be easy and make installation more affordable. 

Pros and Cons

Copper is a beautiful, long-lasting metal that can clad your home for 100 years or more. This durable material is weather resistant, insect resistant, and flame retardant as well as beautiful. It can dent, however, unless the panels are very thick, which increases costs. If you don’t wish it to patina, it can be very high maintenance to keep its original color. 

Installation

Copper is available in standing seam panels that are designed to snap or lock together with the fasteners either hidden inside or visible, depending on your preference. It goes up one panel at a time, with each panel overlapping the next at the standing seam. The panels can either snap at this point, or be locked together with a mechanism that is part of the siding. It installs from the outside corner in, on each wall.

2. Corrugated Metal Siding
House Siding
Image Credit- thehivephilly.com

Get a rustic, modern look for your home with corrugated metal siding. This super durable siding is usually made of steel but can be found in tin in some areas. It’s made of stamped sheets with a distinctive ridged appearance that can complement many styles of home. It can be left as bare metal, “rusted,” or have a powder coat applied in many different colors. 

Cost

Corrugated metal siding is fairly inexpensive at around $5 a square foot. It’s available in several thicknesses, so the thicker it is, the higher its total cost will be.

Pros and Cons

Corrugated metal siding is very durable. It’s often thicker than standing seam or plank metal siding, so it can last longer with no worrying about dents. It’s easy to install, has a rustic appearance that can complement many homes, and has a lot of color variation. It can rust, however, as it is made of steel, so it’s not always the best choice in wet climates.

Installation

Corrugated metal siding must be installed over a solid substrate. The panels are designed to overlap one another and rivet or nail into place. They go up several sections at a time, with each new section overlapping the last, and both getting fastened in one area together. 

3. Snap Batten Panel Siding
House Siding
Image Credit – tetonsteelidaho.com

Snap Batten panel siding is a type of metal standing seam siding that gives you an appearance close to board and batten siding. Each panel has two standing seams that snap onto the next panel. The result is a siding that can give you a rustic modern look without visible fasteners.

Cost

Like many types of metal siding, this material has a cost range between $5 and $10 a square foot depending on thickness.

Pros and Cons

This is a fast and easy way to get the look of board and batten, as a metal siding without visible fasteners. It’s quick and easy to install as each panel locks onto the one beside it. These panels are still made of steel, however, so they can dent as well as rust if not protected from the elements.

Installation

Installation of these panels is simple The first panel will need to be fastened on one side, but each subsequent panel is fitted over the end of the last and snapped into place. The end panels with fasteners are covered with matching trim to hide the fasteners for a clean appearance. 

4. Galvanized Steel Siding
House Siding

Galvanized steel is coated in a layer of zinc, which lets it last longer without rusting or developing some of the issues inherent with most steel siding. Galvanized steel comes in many forms including panels, planks, and a variety of other styles so you can complement any style of home.

Cost

Galvanized steel siding costs between $5 and $10 a square foot depending on the style. The more complex styles and the thicker panels cost the most.

Pros and Cons

Galvanized steel siding doesn’t rust like regular steel siding. It’s also insect and moisture resistant, as well as flame retardant. It’s highly durable, lasting for 50 years or more, and comes in a range of styles. 

Like most metal sidings, however, it’s fairly easy to dent, especially if you opt for thinner panels. It can be painted, but if scratched, the galvanized coating can be removed, and the siding can rust.

Installation

The exact installation of galvanized steel siding will depend on its style, which can be corrugated, snap, standing seam, or even lap siding planks. In most cases, the fasteners are hidden, or the panels snap together, but in a few cases, you may have visible rivets instead. 

5. Aluminum Siding
House Siding
Image Credit – youtube.com

Aluminum siding has been around since the 1930s, and was first introduced as a lightweight, lower maintenance alternative to wood siding. It can appear like a corrugated metal siding, but most often it looks more like wood siding — in a lap panel installation with a realistic wood grain. 

Cost

Aluminum siding can be fairly inexpensive, with costs starting as low as $2 – $4 a square foot. Thicker siding planks and premium colors can up the cost. 

Pros and Cons

Aluminum siding is lightweight, easy to install, and fairly durable, lasting 35 to 50 years on average. It doesn’t rust, and it comes in many colors and styles, so you can complement nearly any home. 

While the color on aluminum doesn’t peel, it does fade over time. This can come off onto your clothes in a chalky dust. To fix this, you do need to repaint, so it’s not entirely maintenance free. It’s also easier to dent than steel siding, making it not a good fit for hail prone areas. 

Installation

Installation will depend on the style of siding you choose. Most come in a type of lap siding that is installed like most wood or vinyl lap sidings — from the bottom up, with each course overlapping the one below it. The aluminum may be nailed into place, or each plank may interlock with the one below it.

Maintenance of Metal Siding

House Siding
Image Credit – advantageexteriorsllc.com

For day-to-day care, metal siding is fairly low maintenance; you can clean it with a garden hose and some detergent if needed. The real maintenance comes over time.

Aluminum needs to be refinished every 5–10 years, while steel that has been scratched needs to be sealed and/or painted to prevent it from rusting. Copper needs to be cleaned regularly with the right detergents to prevent it from developing a patina over time. 

Metal Siding Design Ideas

Metal siding comes in a wide range of styles and finishes. If you’re considering it for your home, check out these design ideas. 

1. Modern Industrial
House Siding
Image Credit – houzz.com

This ultra-modern home features some rusted steel panels as well as galvanized steel planks for a unique and clean-edged appearance. The panels make a unique accent wall and work perfectly with the windows, while the planks create a cleaner look that provides a quiet backdrop for the entire facade. 

2. Corrugated Accent Siding
House Siding
Image Credit – Houzz.com

This beach house uses corrugated metal siding to frame out the oversized windows. The texture of the metal makes a nice contrast to the glass and adds some texture to the walls. The vertical lines of the siding also help emphasize the height of the area, so your eye catches the unique ceiling inside.

Suggested Metal Siding Manufacturers

If you’re considering the purchase of metal siding for your home, check out these quality manufacturers for more information. 

1. McElroy Metal

McElroy Metal specializes in metal siding and roofing, and its metal wall panels are available in a broad range of colors and styles, so you can choose the fit that’s right for your home. You can also coordinate your metal siding with a metal roof to get a fully durable and low maintenance exterior. 

2. TruLog Siding

TruLog manufactures two forms of metal siding — a metal board and batten that mimics the look of wood and an insulated log-look siding made from steel. Both are completely maintenance free — never needing to be repainted or refinished. They also have an authentic appearance to them, while remaining easy to install and highly affordable. 

3. ASC Building Products

ASC has a wide range of metal siding and roofing materials for residential projects, including corrugated siding, standing seam, and panels of varying sizes. Each is available in a selection of colors and finishes, so you can mix and match.

Get a Durable Exterior with Metal Siding

Metal siding is an attractive, durable, and long-lasting siding that can work for many homes. From industrial to contemporary and everything in between, a metal siding that complements your home can be found.

5. Fiber Cement House Siding

House Siding
Image Credit – probuilder.com

Fiber cement siding has been around in one form or another since the 1950s. It’s made from a blend of cellulose fibers (wood pulp), sand, silica, and Portland cement. Some manufacturers will put some amounts of recycled glass into their siding as well.

Fiber cement is incredibly dense and durable. It’s made in a mold, so it can be formed into panels, planks, shingles, shakes, and more. It can be textured or smooth and comes either pre-primed or in a full range of colors. It can mimic the look of many different sidings, from wood to stone, so you can get the look you want for your home.

Cost of Fiber Cement House Siding

House Siding
Image Credit – homereference.net

The cost of fiber cement siding can vary a lot depending on the manufacturer and the style and type of siding you choose. It can range from $4 to $7 a square foot on average, with some premium products costing as much as $10 a square foot. 

Benefits and Disadvantages of Fiber Cement House Siding

House Siding
Image Credit – medium.com

Fiber cement siding is very durable and long-lasting. Most manufacturers warranty their product for 50 years, with the color guaranteed for 10. It’s impervious to moisture, insect activity, and flame and doesn’t peel or chip like wood siding. It comes in an incredible range of colors, sizes, textures, and patterns, so you can design nearly any style of facade that you’re interested in.

Fiber cement siding is very heavy, however, so it can be more difficult and therefore expensive to install. It also produces a lot of silica dust when it’s cut, which can cause health problems if inhaled, so special care needs to be taken to contain the dust during installation. 

How to Install Fiber Cement Siding

House Siding
Image Credit – saalfeldconstruction.com

Fiber cement siding installs a lot like wood siding, with some variations for the type and style. If installing horizontal lap siding, each course installs from the bottom up, with the top courses overlapping those below. It can be nailed directly to the substrate over a wrapped and trimmed exterior. 

Shingles come in long rows, so the installation is faster; you can put up several shingles at one time, rather than individually. The board-and-batten styles are installed like wood, while the panels have a unique channel system to lock them into place quickly and easily. 

Types of Fiber Cement Siding

House Siding
Image Credit – dependableconstruction.com

Fiber cement siding comes in many shapes and sizes. It can be cut like wood, as well as molded into a wide range of styles. The types can vary by manufacturer, but it is possible to find fiber cement in the following types:

Lap siding — Fiber cement comes in many widths and styles of lap siding. Most also come in a broad range of color.

Board and batten — You can purchase fiber cement in both board and batten sizes and combine them to create an authentic board-and-batten look. 

Shingle and Shake — Fiber cement has both straight and irregular edge shingles and individual rustic shakes. This can allow you to customize exactly how rustic you want your exterior to be.

Decorative shingles — You can find fiber cement in decorative shingles like octagons and half rounds, perfect for Victorians and other decorative exteriors.

Architectural panels — Panels are large square or rectangular sections that install with a surrounding channel. They can have a smooth or textured face and are perfect for modern homes. 

Maintenance of Fiber Cement Siding

Fiber cement is a very low maintenance material. The color lasts or years without needing to be touched up or repainted, and it’s unlikely to chip, dent, or crack. To wash it, you can use a hose and some detergent with water along with a scrub brush. Otherwise, it doesn’t require much care at all to stay looking good.

Fiber Cement House Siding Design Ideas

Fiber cement siding can be used to create an incredible range of looks. If you’re considering it for your home, check out these design ideas.

Traditional Lap Siding
House Siding
Image Credit – Houzz.com

Fiber cement siding is ideal for homes that would look best with wood but whose owners want something with lower maintenance. This home is clad in a fiber cement horizontal lap siding. It’s simple, classic, and works perfectly with the architecture of the home. 

Wood Look Fiber Cement
House Siding
Image Credit – Houzz.com

One advantage that fiber cement has over some other materials is its ability to take a stain. By using a wood stain color, you can more closely mimic the look of cedar for the home, but without the worry that it may eventually rot. 

Classic White
House Siding
Image Credit – Houzz.com

White homes and farmhouse style are two of the most popular trends today. However, white siding can take a lot of work to look its best in wood or vinyl, which makes fiber cement a great alternative for creating this classic look. It’s resistant to peeling and chipping, so you can maintain a clean white exterior longer.

Suggested Manufacturers of Fiber Cement House Siding

If you’re considering fiber cement for your home, check out these suggested manufacturers for more information. 

1. Allura

Allura makes an incredible range of styles and colors in fiber cement siding, available in several widths and thicknesses, as well as different styles for shingles, shakes, and panels. They also have matching trim and soffits, so you can completely cover your home in fiber cement. 

2. Nichiha

If what you’re looking for is a range of materials that can mimic the look of wood, stone, or brick in several colors, check out Nichiha, whose materials are sold as either planks or panels but can take on the look of brick, wood planks, stucco, and more. With Nichiha, you can get a truly custom look for your home. 

3. Go Finex

Go Finex has an endless range of colors for its fiber cement panels. The panels can take on the look of wood, stucco, or cement, and are installed with the company’s Trim-Fit system so there’s no drilling involved. These products are durable and attractive and will allow you to perfectly match your ideal color and finish.

Get Durable Style with Fiber Cement

Fiber cement’s ability to mimic the look of stone, wood, or stucco means that you can put it on any home without sacrificing style. This durable and attractive material will last far longer than wood, while giving you all the style and options you need for your home. 

6. Stucco House Siding

House Siding
Image Credit – kruegerbrothers.com

Stucco siding is applied in layers over a base on your home’s exterior. Traditionally, it was made of a blend of cement with lime and some type of aggregate. Newer materials now available contain acrylics for a more flexible application. Instead of being individual pieces, stucco is layered over the home into one, solid finish. It can take on many different textures and can be stained or painted in a range of colors. Stucco is flame retardant and insect resistant, and works well on a number of architectural styles. 

Types of Stucco House Siding

Stucco is available in a variety of styles, application methods, and even material, which can give it different looks and levels of durability. 

1. Traditional Stucco Siding
House Siding
Image Credit – gregunsethpainting.com

Traditional stucco siding is made from a blend of Portland cement, lime, sand, and water. It’s usually applied in three layers over a lath base. It has a moderate texture, and can be pigmented at time of application or painted later. It works well as an insulator, making it a good choice for homes in both very hot and very cold climates.

Pros and Cons

Traditional stucco is very attractive and can be combined with other materials such as half timbering over stucco for a variety of looks. It’s a good insulator and naturally resistant to pests, flames, and moisture issues. Stucco does eventually begin to break down, however, needing repair. When this happens, it can be difficult to color match, so you are likely to need to repaint the entire exterior. Stucco can also be difficult and expensive to install, depending on your area.

Benefits

The biggest benefit of stucco siding is its insulating properties. In a hot, humid climate —  where stucco is most popular — it can help keep energy bills low and keep the indoors more comfortable. Stucco is also fairly long-lasting and isn’t impacted by many of the same issues that harm wood like moisture, insects, or fire.

Installation

Traditional stucco is sometimes called 3 coat stucco or hard coat stucco, referring to the way it’s applied. It starts with a layer of lath applied to the exterior. Then, a thin, scratch coat of cement is applied to the lath and allowed to harden.

The next coat is called the brown coat, which provides the structure to the siding. It goes on more thickly, with more control, and it needs to be allowed to cure slowly over the course of a few days. This means it will need to be wet down frequently to stop it from curing too soon. The finish coat goes on last and gives it its appearance. This is hand troweled, can include pigments or aggregates, can be applied in many patterns and textures. 

2. Synthetic Stucco Siding
House Siding
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Also known as EIFS or Exterior Insulation and Finish System, this type of stucco is made of many thin layers applied to an insulation base. It’s less common than traditional stucco because it’s very time consuming and expensive to apply. It can be finished with many of the same pigments and textures as traditional stucco. 

Pros and Cons

EIFS is an excellent insulator that offers superior protection from heat or cold. It’s also more flexible than traditional stucco, so it can last longer and resists cracking better. This means fewer repairs are needed. This method is very time-consuming to install and it’s more expensive, so it’s rarely used as often as traditional forms. 

Benefits

EIFS offers superior insulation over most other sidings, including traditional stucco. It’s also requires less maintenance than many siding types. Because it’s flexible, it’s less likely to crack, while remaining resistant to flame, insects, and moisture. 

Installation

Synthetic stucco is applied as a spray. First, a foam-style spray insulation is applied to the exterior. Then, thin layers of acrylic are sprayed on and cured very slowly. The siding is built up over a long period of time, layer by layer, until it reaches the top coat, which can be textured and pigmented like traditional stucco. 

Stucco House Siding Finishes

House Siding
Image Credit – thespruce.com

Stucco can be finished in a variety of ways to give your home a variety of looks and textures. 

1. Santa Barbara

This stucco has a smooth texture but an irregular finish. It can resemble marble with swirls of color.

2. Float or Sand

This stucco has a gritty, sandy texture. This is a very common stucco finish, and it can range in terms of depth of grit. 

3. Lace and Skip

This is a traditional style of stucco that has a lacey, flakey texture to it. The texture is larger than the float or sand.

4. Dash

Dash is a highly textured and rough surface. 

5. English

English stucco has a smooth texture. It’s applied in a fashion that makes it appear whipped, so it has waves and undulations in its surface. 

6. Worm

This is also known as a “swirl” or a “putz” finish. It’s an older finish that isn’t as popular as it once was. It uses big pieces of aggregate that get dragged through the finish to create indentations and lines. 

7. Cat Face

Cat face is mostly smooth, but has aggregate applied in sections or patches. This gives it a distinctive texture and appearance.

Stucco Siding Application

House Siding
Image Credit – superiorroofingva.com

Stucco can be applied in one of three ways to the exterior of a home.

1. Thin Stucco

Coat or thin coat stucco is a faster and less expensive way to create a traditional stucco appearance. It’s applied over a lath like traditional stucco, but goes on in one coat – finish and all. The mixture contains fiberglass, so it’s more structurally sound without the need for the middle brown coat. Pigments and aggregates can be added right to the material, so it can go on more quickly. Costs start at $2 – $3 a square foot. 

2. Hard Coat Stucco

Hard coat stucco is the traditional and most common method of applying this siding. It goes on over a lath, with a thin skim coat of concrete followed by a brown coat of structural material, and finished with a pigmented and textured layer. Costs start between $4 and $10 a square foot. 

3. EIFS

This is a synthetic method of applying the stucco that goes on over a sprayed on polyurethane insulation. It goes on in multiple thin coats that take time to cure slowly in between. It has a final top coat that is similar to the other types that can be pigmented or given aggregates. It costs between $9 and $15 a square foot. 

Maintenance of Stucco House Siding

House Siding
Image Credit – perryhoodproperties.com

Stucco is fairly easy to care for. The most common form of maintenance that it needs is cleaning. It attracts dirt easily due to its texture, so you will need to clean it well frequently to keep it looking its best. This is achieved through light agitation with a brush and a mixture of TSP cleaner and water. Avoid pressure washers, as this can crack or damage the stucco.

Over time, stucco can crack, which means that it will need to be patched and repaired. This is done by removing the old stucco from the area down to the lath, and building it back up. The entire area may need to be painted after this if matching the color becomes too difficult. 

Stucco Siding Design Ideas

Stucco works well on a wide range of different architectural styles. If you’re considering adding it to your own home, check out these three design ideas.

Monochrome Exterior
House Siding
Image Credit – Houzz.com

This home has a simple, classic look to it by using a single color over its entirety. The deep beige color of the stucco blends in well with the roof, providing a contrast to the landscaping and making the home appear solid and classic in design. 

Textured Exterior
House Siding
Image Credit – Houzz.com

This home features a highly textured stucco exterior in a classic light color. The texture of the siding works well with the brick on the front walk and the fieldstone used around the landscaping. This helps give a lot of depth to the design, without needing to use a lot of different colors or details to do so.

Subtle Details
House Siding
Image Credit – houzz.com

This classic home has a lot of very subtle detail in its exterior. This includes sections of stucco broken up by indentations in the exterior, as well as coordinating colors of timber to create differing sections as well. The colors of the roof and shutters add some depth to the design without any contrast, so that the structure has interest in a subtle, rich way.

Get Classic Good Looks with Stucco

While stucco can be more expensive than some other types of siding, it’s an attractive and long lasting material. It can also help you stay more comfortable indoors year round by providing a good amount of exterior insulation. 

7. Brick and Faux Brick House Siding

House Siding
Image Credit – pinterest.com

Brick and faux brick siding can give your home a very classic appearance with little to no maintenance. Brick comes in a range of colors and can be used alone or with other siding types to create unique and interesting looks. Faux brick or brick veneer is a thinner type of brick that can give you the same look for your home, but at a fraction of the cost. 

Cost

The cost of solid brick siding is around $23 a square foot, while brick veneer or faux brick can cost much lower – around $3 – $7 a square foot depending on the exact type and the thickness of the material. 

Pros and Cons

Brick siding can offer structural support to a building. It’s also flame retardant, insect and moisture resistant, and needs very little maintenance. It can be painted if you ever want to change the color of your home, or it looks great on its own. 

However, it can be expensive compared to other siding types. And if it does need repair such as repointing of the mortar, this can also be expensive.

Maintenance of Brick or Faux Brick House Siding

There is little maintenance required for brick siding beyond keeping it clean. If it has not been painted, it can be pressure washed to help remove dirt and debris. You can also use TSP diluted with water and a scrub brush to clean it, or you can use nearly any type of detergent with or without a hose and scrub brush.

If it has been painted, make sure to use a less caustic detergent than TSP and avoid the pressure washer as this can cause it to peel. 

Otherwise, check for crumbling or cracked mortar yearly and have the brick repointed as necessary if cracks appear. 

Brick or Faux Brick Siding Design Ideas

Brick can give your home a classic appearance whether it’s done on its own or with another material. If you’re thinking about siding your home in brick, check out these design ideas.

Classic Red Brick
House Siding

There’s no look quite like the classic red brick. The brick itself has a lot of subtle color variation between the pieces, which helps create a random pattern over its surface. This means that you don’t need any extra trim or additional sidings to help make the home stand out. 

Brick with Stucco
House Siding
Image Credit – Houzz.com

It’s very common to pair brick with stucco and stucco with timber on many homes. This home uses a very uniform red brick with little color variation. It’s paired with a timbered stucco in a lighter color, with the timbers matching the color of the mortar for a very cohesive design. 

Painted Brick
House Siding

Brick can look fantastic once it’s been painted. The key is to paint both the brick and the mortar together, which creates texture without breaking up the exterior. This home also features some stucco panels in the same color, so it has subtle interest along with a cohesive design. 

Suggested Brick or Faux Brick Siding Manufacturers

If you’re considering brick or faux brick siding for your home, check out these suggested manufacturers.

1. GenStone

If you’re looking for an authentic looking brick veneer, check out GenStone. They cast their veneers from real bricks, so they have a better looking texture to them. They come in four different colors as well, so you can find out that matches your home’s style. 

2. Belden Brick

No matter what type of brick or brick veneer you’re looking for, you can find it at Belden Brick. They make structural bricks, thin bricks for veneer, standard bricks, and oversized bricks. All come in varying colors so you can customize the appearance of your home.

Get Timeless Durability with Brick

Brick siding has a look and style all its own. It’s also durable and long lasting as well as low maintenance. If you’re looking for timeless durability of your home, consider brick siding. 

8. Glass Exterior House Siding

House Siding
Image Credit – youtube.com

From glass blocks to glass panels, while glass isn’t technically a siding it can be used as an exterior cover for your home. Glass can allow a lot of light into your home and can give you fantastic views from your living room. Whichever type of glass exterior you choose, it will need to have a structural framework, as the glass itself cannot lend support. 

Cost

Glass exteriors can be expensive, costing between $700 and $1,600 per linear foot depending on the frame and glass type. For this reason, it’s common to use it just on portions of an exterior.

Pros and Cons

Glass exteriors can make a really dramatic look on any home. They’ll increase the amount of daylighting a home has, and can give you great views of the area outside. They can also make your interiors feel larger than they really are. Glass is expensive, however, and it requires a solid structural frame, so you may need to bring a structural engineer onto the project. Glass is also a poor insulator, so if you live in a very hot or cold climate, you may need to spend more both on energy efficient glass and on energy costs in general. Glass also doesn’t offer much in the way of privacy if you have neighbors nearby. 

Maintenance of A Glass Siding Exterior

Glass is actually fairly easy to maintain. It can be cleaned with a low pressure hose as well as a variety of detergents and even standard glass cleaners. Smudges are usually the biggest issue with glass exteriors, as the material doesn’t hold onto dirt; the surface is so smooth.

The caulk around the glass should be checked annually and replaced as needed to help keep it weathertight. 

Glass Exterior Siding Design Ideas

If you’re considering a glass exterior, check out these design ideas.

Mixed Material
House Siding
Image Credit – Dwell.com

This contemporary home features some large glass panels along one section of the exterior. The glass is mixed with some vertical timber and brick siding, which both add some texture and contrast to the glass. The glass itself is done in large panes so allow for maximum light and views. 

Long Glass Wall
House Siding
Image Credit – Dwell.com

This home features a vertical timber exterior except along one wall. This one wall features floor to ceiling glass panels along its entirety. It offers a full view into and out of the house from multiple angles, and helps complement the long, low lines of the architecture at the same time. 

Brighten Your Exterior with Glass

Glass exteriors aren’t for every home, but they can make a striking appearance on many architectural styles. Add glass to your exterior to help brighten up your home. 

9. Steel Log House Siding

House Siding
Image Credit – trulogsiding.com

Steel log siding is in a class all its own. This unique material is made of insulated steel, but made to look like authentic log siding. It can be installed on any home to give it the look of a log cabin, but with better maintenance and durability. Available in many attractive colors, this material can offer great performance for years to come. 

Cost of Steel Log House Siding

Steel log siding costs between $4.75 and $5.75 a square foot depending on the color – premium colors cost more than the standard.

Pros and Cons of Steel Log House Siding

Steel log siding is a fully insulated, durable, and low maintenance material. It will help improve the energy efficiency of your home, and the finish is virtually maintenance free; it’s guaranteed not to peel, chip, or fade. Steel is also flame retardant as well as naturally insect and moisture resistant. It’s also unlikely to dent or need a lot of care.

It can be expensive and may be more difficult to install if you have an installer who hasn’t worked with it before. Steel can be heavy. The material is also not meant to be painted, so you won’t be able to change the color down the road without marring the finish.

Color Options for Steel Log Siding

House Siding
Image Credit – youtube.com

Steel log siding is meant to look like a real log home once it’s installed. It comes in 8 attractive finishes that are designed to give your home the look of wood. This includes several natural shades such as cedar, pine, and walnut, as well as other shades like weathered gray and a rich canyon red.

Maintenance of Steel Log House Siding

Steel log siding is designed to be virtually maintenance free. It never needs chinking, caulking, or repainting. If needed, it could be pressure washed to remove any surface dirt. 

Steel Log Siding Design Ideas

If you’re interested in steel log siding for your home, check out these design ideas.

Cedar with Red Trim
House Siding
Image Credit – trulogsiding.com

While most log siding has trouble with the ends or trim, steel log siding can be trimmed in a few ways. This home uses a classic white trim with a cedar colored log look siding. It helps give the cabin a really crisp look and finish.

Pine with Stone
House Siding
Image Credit – trulogsiding.com

Steel log look siding can be combined with other materials to give your home a more rural or rustic appearance. This home features a lower section that is done in a stone siding while the upper section has a pine steel siding exterior. The contrast between the two add a lot of depth and interest to the design. 

Classic Cabin Look
House Siding

This home done in Canyon Red log look steel siding has a classic cabin appearance to it. Along with the steel log siding is a natural wood porch and some stone veneer on the front. These materials combine to give the home a more authentic appearance, but without the maintenance or care. 

Suggested Manufacturer

If you’re considering steel log look siding, be sure to pay a visit to TruLog. Their quality log look steel siding has an authentic appearance along with a range of color choices. All of their log look siding is fully insulated as well, helping to improve the energy performance of the house. 

Get the Look of a Log Cabin with Steel Log Siding

Steel log siding can give you the appearance of a real log home, but without any of the maintenance or care. It can also be installed over any existing home, completely changing its style. 

10. Half Timbering on Stucco

House Siding
Image Credit – pinterest.com

Half timbering on stucco is a great way to add dimension and interest to a stucco home. It involves first stuccoing your exterior, then using timber siding to create sections, patterns, and layers on your exterior. Originally, this was a method of exposing the home’s structure, but today it’s merely a decorative way of updating your exterior. 

Cost

Expect costs to be slightly higher than the average cost to stucco a home. Stucco starts at around $4 a square foot, while the cost of the timbering is around $2 – $3 a square foot. 

Pros and Cons

Half timbering on stucco can give your home a unique look with more interest and dimension. It can allow you to pick out specific areas of your architecture to highlight, and means you can add some contrast in color between the two materials as well. 

Adding timber to stucco does mean increasing the maintenance of these areas, however. And if the wood becomes water logged, it causes cracking of the stucco in those areas as well, which can lead to further repairs.

Add Dimension with Half Timbering on Stucco

If you want a really classic look for your home with the durability of stucco, consider half timbering over a stucco exterior. This classic style will work well on many architectural types, highlighting their beauty. 

11. Insulated Vinyl House Siding

House Siding
Image Credit – smartextpros.com

If you like the low maintenance care of vinyl, but want to reduce your energy costs, consider installing insulated vinyl. Insulated vinyl siding is regular vinyl, but with a rigid foam insulation backing. It helps create a tight building envelope around your exterior, so there are fewer air gaps and less energy loss.

Comparison between Vinyl Siding and Insulated Vinyl Siding

House Siding
Image Credit – MidAtlantic Contracting

Traditional vinyl siding is made of thin, almost hollow plastic planks with a realistic wood grain texture and appearance. They come in many styles and colors, and are fairly low maintenance. However, they don’t insulate your home on their own. They can also become very brittle in cold temperatures and soften and melt in hot temperatures.

Insulated vinyl siding is the same exterior vinyl, in all the same colors and styles. The difference is its backing, which not only stops energy transfer and makes your home more comfortable, it also helps reduce sound. The backing also helps make the vinyl a little more durable, so it’s less likely to crack in cold weather.

Cost of Insulated Vinyl House Siding

Insulated vinyl siding costs between $4 and $12 a square foot. The variation in costs depends largely on style and color, with more decorative styles and premium colors costing more than standard. 

Pros and Cons of Insulated Vinyl House Siding

The biggest pros from insulated vinyl siding are the reduced energy costs, more comfortable home interior, and the better sound insulation. These are combined with the same pros from regular vinyl siding – it’s lightweight, easy to install, and very low maintenance never requiring painting, scraping, or patching.

The downsides are similar to regular vinyl as well. While it’s a little more durable, it can still be impacted by weather, cracking in very cold temperatures and softening when it gets hot.

Maintenance of Insulated Vinyl House Siding

Insulated vinyl is just as easy to maintain as regular vinyl. You can use regular detergent with a scrub brush and a hose, or a pressure washer on a low setting to remove any surface dirt. Otherwise, the siding is virtually maintenance free. 

Suggested Manufacturers

If you’re considering insulated vinyl for your home, check out these suggested manufacturers for more information.

1. Provia

Provia makes an insulated vinyl siding with a realistic looking cedar grain. They use a rigid foam that is designed to help mask the dips and bumps in most walls, so your siding looks straighter and truer, while also helping to insulate your home at the same time. 

2. Certainteed

Certainteed makes a durable, quality vinyl siding backed with foam insulation as well. It comes in 18 attractive and stylish colors, so you can coordinate with your home’s architectural style for the perfect look. It comes in three profiles including clapboard and board-and-batten, so you can mix and match to get the ideal appearance for your exterior. 

3. Ply Gem

Ply Gem also makes a durable insulated vinyl siding. Their insulation is both lightweight and breathable — important when creating a tight building envelope around your home as it allows build up moisture to escape. Their vinyl has a realistic, wood grain finish as well. 

Get Better Energy Performance with Insulated Vinyl

House Siding
Image Credit – thebalancesmb.com

Insulated vinyl siding gives you the low maintenance exterior you want with the energy performance you need. It’s lightweight, impact resistant, and easy to install as well, giving you a better choice for how you clad your home.

12. Engineered Wood House Siding

House Siding
Image Credit – modernize.com

If you like the look of real wood siding, but want something that’s a little bit more durable and lower in maintenance, considered engineered wood siding. This material looks and handles like real wood, but it’s made from a blend of wood fibers and resins. This means that it’s insect resistant, and better able to resist moisture as well. It has an authentic wood grain, and many brands come pre-primed and painted with a 15 year guarantee, so it’s much lower in maintenance than real wood as well. 

Cost of Engineered Wood House Siding

Engineered wood siding costs between $4 and $9 a square foot installed. This is in line with many real wood sidings, but with the added bonus of needing to be painted before or after install. 

Pros and Cons of Engineered Wood House Siding

Engineered wood siding looks and handles like real wood. It has an authentic appearance, but it’s more durable and longer lasting than wood. It’s also lower in maintenance, not needing to be scraped and painted quite as often.

The downsides include the lack of versatility in product when compared to wood. With wood, you can choose different species for character or color, and you can choose from a nearly endless array of styles. Engineered wood is a little more confined in what you can install. It also may have some issues with moisture resistance, particularly if it isn’t installed properly.

Maintenance of Engineered Wood House Siding

House Siding
Image Credit – valiantexteriors.com

Engineered wood siding is fairly low maintenance. It can be cleaned with a basic detergent, scrub brush and hose in most instances. In some cases, you can also use a pressure washer, but keep in mind that this may void the warranty on the finish. 

Engineered Wood Siding Design Ideas

Engineered wood siding looks just as good as wood siding in most instances. If you’re wondering how you may be able to use it on your home, take a look at the following design ideas.

Mixed Material
House Siding
Image Credit – houzz.com

Just like real wood siding, you can mix and match with engineered wood siding as well. This home features two styles of siding, and some stone veneer. The colors of the siding helps to add some dimension and depth to the design, as does the mixture of shingles and lap siding.

Traditional Style
House Siding
Image Credit – houzz.com

This traditional home features engineered wood siding in a lap style. The color is designed to pick up the mortar on the brick siding used around the skirt of the house. Together, the two materials help create a durable and attractive facade. 

Triple Colored Siding
House Siding
Image Credit – houzz.com

This home features three colors of engineered wood siding in two different styles. This allows the siding to highlight the architecture of the home, showing it off to its best advantage.

Suggested Manufacturers

If you’re interested in installing engineered wood siding on your home, check out these manufactures for more information.

1. LP’s SmartSide is one of the most recognizable names in engineered wood siding. They make several styles and a wide range of colors for their siding, all with a durable, long lasting finish. 

2. Kaycan makes an engineered wood siding that is made of 100% recycled wood content. This makes a siding that is not only attractive and durable, but also more eco-friendly as well. 

Get a More Durable Wood Siding

Engineered wood siding has many of the benefits and styles of real wood siding, but with better durability and lower maintenance. If you like the look of wood, but not its care, consider engineered wood siding for your home.

13. Log Siding

House Siding
Image Credit – Kwaterski Bros

Log siding can be installed onto any home, giving it the look of a log cabin. This siding can be made of split logs, vinyl, or insulated steel, and it can come in many different colors and finishes. Each material will behave like other sidings of that kind. For example, steel siding will be flame retardant and easy to maintain while split log siding will need to be periodically pressure washed and stained. 

Cost of Log Siding

Log siding can have a wide range of costs depending on what it’s made from. Costs start around $2 a square foot for pine split logs and go as high as $5.75 a square foot for insulated steel log-look siding. 

Pros and Cons of Log Siding

Log siding is a great way to give your home the look of a real log cabin, but without the issues of settling, chinking, and warping that log cabins have. Because they can be installed on an existing timber frame, they’re also a lot less expensive than needing to build a log home from scratch.

The cons of log siding mostly come from the material you choose. For example, vinyl log siding will soften in hot climates and become brittle in cold climates, while pine log siding will be subject to insects and moisture problems. 

Installation of Log Siding

House Siding
Image Credit – buffalo-lumber.com

Each type of log siding will be installed differently, but most are formed to overlap one another slightly, so that the first course can be nailed to the wall, then the second course snaps onto this at the bottom, and is nailed into place at the top. This moves upward to the top of the installation, where the final edge is covered with trim. 

Maintenance of Log Siding

The maintenance of your log siding will depend largely on what it’s made from. Wood log siding will need to be periodically pressure washed and stained. You’ll also need to check for rot and insect activity on a yearly basis.

Vinyl and steel can be cleaned as needed, but don’t require any staining or sealing. 

Log Siding Design Ideas

Log siding can be installed on any style of home to give it the look of a cabin or rustic resort. If you’re wondering how it may look on your home, consider these design ideas. 

Mixed Material

House Siding
Image Credit – northernlogsupply.com

Consider the look of log siding mixed with fieldstone or another stone siding to get a more rural and rustic appearance for your home. Log siding comes in many colors, so it’s easy to contrast with the stone such as this home which uses a warm colored stain and a cool colored stone to make the two stand out. 

Log Porch

House Siding
Image Credit – northernlogsupply.com

Complement your log siding by using split logs to create a wrap around porch. Log homes tend to conjure the idea of being outdoors in nature, so adding a deck or porch that matches the exterior of your home can make a great statement, and help to transform your home more effectively into a log cabin.

Considerations When Choosing the Right Home Siding

Whenever you select a new siding for your home, you should weigh several factors together to help make the right choice for your property. 

1. Cost

There is an incredible range of costs associated with siding. Make sure that you consider both the cost of the material and the cost to install it. Sometimes what seems like a good deal can actually be more expensive to install, making another material a potentially better fit. 

2. Lifespan

Tied into the cost of the siding is how long it will last. If you need to replace the siding earlier than expected, then its costs will end up being higher in the long run. Siding can last anywhere from 20 to 100 years, so make sure that you discuss the lifespan of the material you’re considering with your installer when the time comes. 

3. Durability

Part of the lifespan of a product is its durability. Material that rots easily, peels, chips, or requires a lot of work to keep it looking its best is going to cost you more in the long run than a more durable and lower maintenance material. Consider how the siding you want performs and looks after 5, 10, or 20 years. 

4. Weather Conditions

Not every siding is meant for every climate. Some, like vinyl, will work best in a moderate climate. Others, like aluminum are likely to dent in the event of a hail storm. On the other hand, vinyl outperforms wood when it comes to very rainy weather. Find out how siding tends to do in your specific climate before investing. 

5. Aesthetics

The way that the siding looks cannot be overlooked. Your siding is going to create your home’s curb appeal and play a big role in its value. Make sure that the siding matches your home’s architecture, and that it makes the statement you’re looking for. 

6. Energy Efficiency

If you live in a very hot or cold climate, you may want to pay attention to the energy efficiency of your siding as well. Steel log siding, stucco, and insulated vinyl all make good choices for keeping energy bills down. 

House Siding FAQs

1. How much does it cost to put siding on a house

The average cost to side a home is $3 – $11 a square foot or $4,293 to $15,741 on averag

2. What is the cheapest siding to put on a house

Vinyl is usually the least expensive at $2 – $3 a square foot. 

3. How to install a new window in a house with vinyl siding

The average cost of a new window installation is $450 – $1,500 depending on the window size and shape.

4. Which of the following is a fire-resistant house siding material?

Steel, fiber cement, aluminum, stucco, stone, and brick are all flame retardant siding materials. 

5. How to remove vinyl siding?

Use a pry bar to pull the siding down at a horizontal seam, pulling straight off the house.

6. How to install mounting block on existing vinyl siding?

Mark the area you want the block installed on the siding, then cut away the section of siding. Fit the block behind the siding by pulling it gently away from the siding, and snapping it into place. 

7. How much does it cost to remove and replace vinyl siding?

The average range is between $5,000 and $15,000 to remove and replace vinyl siding on a 2,000sq.ft. home.

8. How to repair vinyl siding?

Slide your fingers under the piece of siding you wish to remove to unlock it from the rows above and below. Insert a new piece of siding into the area, and lock it into the place.

9. How to get rid of bees in siding?

Wait until after dark to funnel dry insecticide beneath the siding where the bees are located. Wait at least one week before going back to remove the nest or replace affected siding.

House Siding Design Ideas

Below, you’ll find some inspiration and ideas for siding of all kinds, so you can find the best fit for your home and application. 

Wood Siding Design Ideas

Wood siding is one of the most popular and versatile materials around, making it readily available for all styles of home. 

Wood with Limestone

House Siding
Image Credit- houzz.com

This home features a drop channel wood siding section on a home that is otherwise clad in limestone. The two materials together create a very modern, yet natural look for the home. 

Shiplap

House Siding
Image Credit- houzz.com

This contemporary home is clad in a rich wood siding that’s been installed in a shiplap. This type of lap siding has overlapping edges with a channel between them. It gives a more modern appearance than more traditional lap sidings, with plenty of variation in the color of the wood and stain. 

Mid Century Modern

House Siding
Image Credit- houzz.com

Mid Century architecture is one of the most endearing and popular styles around. This home is clad in a vertical tongue and groove application for a seamless look that draws the eye upward and emphasizes the home’s height and shape. 

Vinyl House Siding Design Ideas

Vinyl siding can be used on a variety of home styles to give you a range of traditional and transitional looks. 

Traditional Colonial

House Siding
Image Credit- houzz.com

This Colonial makes great use of a neutral colored vinyl siding. Combined with a crisp white trim and a black shutter, the home has a classic appeal and appearance. 

Classic White

House Siding
Image Credit- houzz.com

White is one of the most popular colors for siding in the US. With vinyl, it’s easy to keep that nice clean look for your home, since it can be cleaned so much more easily than wood. Paired with clean white trim and a black shutter, this home has classic appeal. 

Dual Siding Styles

House Siding
Image Credit- houzz.com

This Craftsman is clad in a horizontal lap siding on the bottom and with a cedar-look shingle on top. They are separated by a crisp white trim that helps emphasize the lines of the home. The mix of siding shapes helps bring dimension and interest to the home. 

Metal Siding Design Ideas

Metal siding is ideal for creating industrial and contemporary styles for many homes. 

Corrugated Exterior

House Siding
Image Credit- houzz.com

The entirety of this home’s exterior has been clad in a corrugated metal siding. The material has a lot of movement and interest to it, that helps keep the space looking modern, but charming at the same time. 

Two-Tone

House Siding
Image Credit- houzz.com

This home features two different metal sidings and finishes to give it some depth and dimension, as well as a lot of modern appeal. It has a rust-colored smooth metal siding over the majority of the exterior, but with a bright corrugated accent that pops near the entrance. 

Stone Siding Design Ideas

Stone siding comes in many colors, shapes, and styles, so it’s easy to find one that can complement your home. 

Pattern

House Siding
Image Credit- houzz.com

This white home features a stone siding that uses a repeating pattern in the same, solid color. The pattern adds subtle texture and dimension, complemented by the single color which helps make the property look clean and elegant. 

Stone Accents

House Siding
Image Credit- houzz.com

Stone siding works beautifully with a wide range of other siding styles and materials. This property uses stone siding around the lower half of the home, including on the tower. It blends in beautifully with a shingle siding that picks up the lighter hues of the stone. 

Rustic Siding

House Siding
Image Credit- houzz.com

This French Country style home uses a rustic stone siding over the bulk of its exterior. The texture and color variation in the stone gives the home a durable and old fashioned appearance. A cedar shingle accent on one wall helps to break up the stone and add some interest to the space. 

Fiber Cement Siding Design Ideas

Fiber cement siding can mimic the look of wood, stone, or stucco easily, making it a good fit for homes of all styles. 

Straight Edge Shingles

House Siding
Image Credit- houzz.com

This Craftsman style home uses fiber cement in a straight edge shingle over its entirety. The clean edges of the shingles keep the home looking more traditional, while the texture of the fiber cement gives it a more natural appearance in keeping with the Craftsman tone. 

Traditional Clapboard

House Siding
Image Credit- houzz.com

This traditional home looks its best when done in a simple siding on the exterior. That’s why this fiber cement clapboard siding is such a good fit. It easily complements the clean lines of the home, letting the architecture be the focus of the design. 

Irregular Shingle Siding

House Siding
Image Credit- houzz.com

This Craftsman bungalow features an irregular shingle siding made of fiber cement. The uneven edges of the shingles add character to the exterior, which works well with the lines and dimensions of the bungalow. 

Stucco Siding Design Ideas

Stucco is a popular material for homes in the South, and it works well on many architectural styles. 

Simple Stucco

House Siding
Image Credit- houzz.com

This home has a lot of things going on with its architecture and its landscaping. That’s why the simple stucco exterior works so well; it allows the lines of the home to take center stage, without competing for attention.

Unique Lines

House Siding
Image Credit- houzz.com

This Mediterranean style property has a lot of unique lines from the rooftop to the doorways. The way that stucco is applied easily accommodates these unique lines in a way that other sidings couldn’t do. It helps complement the exterior, without competing for style. 

Wood Accents

House Siding
Image Credit- houzz.com

One of the nice things about stucco is that it allows other accents to really pop against its surface. In this case, the natural wood doors and gates make beautiful contrasts with the siding to add interest and dimension to the home. 

Engineered Wood Siding Design Ideas

Engineered wood siding is virtually identical in appearance to real wood siding, making it a good fit for many properties. 

Drop Channel Style

House Siding
Image Credit- houzz.com

This home uses engineered wood siding in a drop channel installation. This helps complement the clean, contemporary lines of the home for a simple and effective exterior. 

Traditional Clapboard

House Siding
Image Credit- houzz.com

This home features a traditional clapboard siding with a 7-inch reveal, meaning that the siding is a little wider than some. This gives some additional charm and definition to the home, making it more appealing to view. 

Glass Exterior Design Ideas

Whether you want a single wall of glass, or multiple walls, there are several ways to incorporate this material into your exterior. 

Framed Glass Accent Wall

House Siding
Image Credit- houzz.com

This wall overlooking the patio outside is done in many framed panels of glass. The frames help add stability to the wall, while the glass offers unparalleled views no matter which side you’re standing on. 

Multiple Glass Walls

House Siding
Image Credit- houzz.com

This contemporary home features numerous glass walls made out of large panels. The different elevations of the walls and the way they wrap the home makes a statement, while offering maximum light and views.

Glass Section

House Siding
Image Credit- houzz.com

Sometimes just having one room or section of the home walled off in glass is enough to give you the light and statement you’re looking for. This small bump out is completely framed in glass, complementing the other clean and modern lines of the home. 

Log Siding Design Ideas

If you like the idea of a log home, then log siding may be the right fit for your project. 

Mixed Material

House Siding
Image Credit- houzz.com

This home features both log siding and stone siding around the skirt and lower level. The two materials help complement the space, creating a very rustic and natural appearance for the property. 

Log and Shingle

House Siding
Image Credit- houzz.com

This home features a very traditional log look for the lower half, complete with the exposed log ends. Beneath the rafters, though, you’ll see an irregular cedar shingle application in the same color as the logs. This changes the profile of the home, making it more modern and giving it visual appeal.

Visible Chinking

House Siding
Image Credit- houzz.com

This rustic log home features visible chinking between the logs. This is a type of sealant that helps keep the home air and water tight. It also gives it a more rustic appearance that works well on some homes. 

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